Collis P. Huntington - Short Route Railway Transfer Company of Louisville, Kentucky

Price: $600.00
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Manufacturer Description

Collis Potter Huntington (1821-1900), Railroad Magnate, Capitalist. Started life as a peddler. Later, became involved with Leland Stanford, Charles Crocker, and Mark Hopkins (called "The Big Four"), also called the "Huntington Group". They financed a survey for the transcontinental route and secured government support. They won exclusive control. The railroad known as the Central Pacific was completed to a junction with the Union Pacific in 1869. Further involvement in other railroads led to the Southern Pacific. Later in 1890 he displaced Stanford as President of the Southern Pacific. He was greatly interested in developing the Chesapeake & Ohio. Vindictive and untruthful, he was a persistent opponent of the idea that his railroads were to any degree burdened with obligations to the public. He signs this great 1884 railroad stock as President. Great signature slightly affected by the hole cancellation. A nice portrait of Huntington is included. Excellent Condition. Collis P. Huntington was born in Harwinton, Connecticut in 1821. In 1842 he and his brother established a successful business in Oneonta, New York, selling general merchandise. When he saw opportunity blooming in America's West, he set out for California, and established himself as a merchant in Sacramento at the start of the California Gold Rush. Huntington succeeded in his California business, too, and it was here that he teamed up with Mark Hopkins selling miners' supplies and other hardware. In the late 1850s, he and Hopkins joined forces with two other successful businessmen, Leland Stanford and Charles Crocker, to pursue the idea of creating a rail line that would connect the America's East and West. In 1861, these four businessmen (sometimes referred to as The Big Four) pooled their resources and business acumen, and formed the Central Pacific Railroad company to create the western link of America's transcontinental railway system. Of the four, he had a...

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